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On Campus Living

Covenant Seminary’s on-campus apartments provide affordable living for single students and families with children. Located a short walk from the classroom, the apartments provide a community living environment where families and singles can interact. Each apartment comes equipped with a furnace/AC, refrigerator, oven, dishwasher, and washer and dryer. The apartments are located around a playground and parking lot. To apply for campus housing, applicants must first be admitted to the Seminary, at which time they may be placed on the housing list.

Housing Handbook  +

Family Units

  • 3 Bedroom - [$960/mo - $985/mo]Unit Price
  • 946 sq. ft.Square Footage
  • Parkway School District
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
  • 2 Bedroom - [$800/mo]Unit Price
  • 795 sq. ft.Square Footage
  • Parkway School District
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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On Campus Living

Covenant Seminary’s on-campus apartments provide affordable living for families with children and single students. Located a short walk from the classroom, the apartments provide a community living environment where families and singles can interact. Each apartment comes fully furnished, equipped with a furnace/AC, refrigerator, oven, dishwasher, and washer and dryer. The apartments are located around a playground and parking lot. To apply for campus housing, applicants must first be admitted to the Seminary, at which time they may be placed on the housing list.

Housing Handbook  +

Singles Units

  • Single bedroom - [$425/mo]Unit Price
  • Fully Furnished
  • On Campus Location
  • Double bedroom - [$320/mo]Unit Price
  • Fully Furnished
  • On Campus Location
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Gulf Drive

Gulf Drive apartments provide a community housing opportunity for seminary families with or without children. Situated 12 miles east of the Seminary campus (about a 20 minute drive), the Gulf Drive community is close to many popular parts of the city, including shopping in Brentwood, restaurants in Clayton, The Loop in University City, and Forest Park. Each apartment comes equipped with a furnace/AC, refrigerator, washer/dryer hookups and has hardwood floors and a full basement. To apply to live at Gulf Drive, applicants must be admitted to the Seminary, at which time they may be placed on the Gulf Drive housing list.

Housing Handbook  +

Gulf Drive Units

  • Double Bedroom - [$675/mo]Unit Price
  • 880 sq. ft.Square Footage
  • University City School District
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • Gulf Drive Location
  • Single bedroom - [$565/mo]Unit Price
  • 660 sq. ft.Square Footage
  • University City School District
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • Gulf Drive Location
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Living Here

Consisting of three main areas, Tower Grove East, Tower Grove South, and Tower Grove Heights, the Tower Grove area takes its name from the majestic and historic Tower Grove Park, which was part of land originally owned by St. Louis businessman and botanist Henry Shaw. Shaw donated the land for the park in 1868.

Over the years, the Tower Grove area has grown from a prairie to a rich agricultural area to coal mining and brick manufacturing district to an active business and residential neighborhood. Anchored by the majestic Tower Grove Park and Missouri Botanical Garden, the area has seen many changes over the decades, but the glue of the neighborhood has always been its people and their strong desire to create a great community. Today the Tower Grove neighborhood and its business districts are diverse, evolving, and thriving.

Quick Facts

  • www.towergrovepark.orgCity Website
  • 21,863Neighborhood Population
  • St. Louis City Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Tower Grove

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Living Here

St. Louis is divided into 79 neighborhoods, with several often being grouped together under the designations "North City" or "South City." South City encompasses a range of neighborhoods from Tower Grove Park on the north to historic Carondelet on the far south and includes Holly Hills, St. Louis Hills, Dutchtown, The Hill, Lindenwood Park, and many others, each reflecting the diversity of the various immigrant populations that came to St. Louis in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

With a growing ethnic diversity, several historic neighborhoods, appealing attractions, and housing ranging from four-family flats to rows of gingerbread-style houses and everything in between, South City offers a bit of something for everyone.

Quick Facts

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South City

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Living Here

The diverse historic community of Soulard, located just south of downtown St. Louis, is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city, with homes dating from the mid- to late 1800s. Soulard is named for the Frenchman who originally surveyed the area for the King of Spain. It features beautifully restored 19th-century red brick Victorian and Federal-style townhouses. Soulard Farmer's Market, located at Lafayette and Seventh Streets, is one of the oldest public markets still in existence in the US.

Wednesdays through Saturdays, local residents, immigrants, and visitors regularly browse the stalls of local farmers for fresh vegetables, meats, cheeses, bakery goods, and flowers. Many farmers have been selling at the market for several generations.

Quick Facts

  • http://soulard.orgCity Website
  • 3,440Neighborhood Population
  • St. Louis City Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Soulard

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Living Here

The neighborhood was founded in 1908 as part of the major development and rapid growth in the area following the 1904 World's Fair and Olympic Games. The neighborhood became racially integrated in 1964, and unlike many other St. Louis neighborhoods, has remained racially and economically diverse. The neighborhood was designated a Local Historic District by the City of St. Louis in 1978, and the private subdivision of Parkview is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The neighborhood today continues to be one of the most vital and livable neighborhoods in the metropolitan area. A major attraction for homeowners is the great diversity of housing in Skinker DeBaliviere. Ranging from historic single-family homes on quiet private and public streets, to newly constructed town homes in Kingsbury Square, to gracious two-family flats and apartment buildings.

Quick Facts

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Skinker DeBaliviere

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Living Here

In 1902, magazine publisher Edward Gardner Lewis purchased 85 acres just northwest of the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair Forest Park construction site that he wanted to be the headquarters for the Lewis Publishing Company as well the site for a “high-class residential district.” Lewis decided to develop the area as a model city, a real “City Beautiful.” Lewis broke ground for the publishing company’s headquarters in 1903. The city’s name reflected the community’s proximity to Washington University, and Lewis’ hope that it would become a center of learning and culture. The University City School District formed and in 1915, University City was one of the first cities in the country to develop a junior high school system.

University City has a strong community culture with a rich tradition of excellence in the creative and performing arts. There are ample opportunities for citizens to enjoy a hobby while becoming involved in the community.

Quick Facts

  • www.ucitymo.orgCity Website
  • 35,371Neighborhood Population
  • University City Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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University City

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Living Here

The area was created during the period of the City's westward expansion in the late 19th century and the building boom of the 1904 World's Fair. During this time, private streets with beautiful, luxurious residences were built. Today, the stately homes on tree-lined streets maintain the prestigous neighborhood.

The Central West End is an eclectic, cosmopolitan showplace of St. Louis. Located in the central corridor of the City, just north of Forest Park, the area is a popular gathering place. A fine selection of restaurants and sidewalk cafes are nestled in with notable art galleries, antique shops, specialty shops, boutiques, and bookstores.

Quick Facts

  • http://thecwe.org/City Website
  • 14,473Neighborhood Population
  • St. Louis City Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Central West End

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Living Here

Lafayette Square, one of the oldest neighborhoods in St. Louis, surrounds Lafayette Park, which is the city's oldest public park, created by ordinance in 1836. The park remains the only land within the city never under private ownership. When the neighborhood was developed, it was one of the most fashionable in the city. The neighborhood declined after a tornado devastated the area in 1896. As of 2006, most of the homes have been restored and the neighborhood is home to many shops and restaurants.

Lafayette Square is a reminder of Victorian St. Louis in its most flamboyant years, the last quarter of the 19th century, and is notable for its many historic homes. Lafayette Park, the focal point of the Square, is a last link to the little French settlement of 1764 and an extension of the original St. Louis Commons.

Quick Facts

  • www.lafayettesquare.orgCity Website
  • 2,078Neighborhood Population
  • St. Louis City Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Lafayette Square

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Living Here

When the City of St. Louis split from St. Louis County in 1876, the county courts, long housed within city limits, were left without a home. After much consideration, in 1877, county officials chose a site donated by farmers Ralph Clayton and Martin Hanley as the new county seat. In the decades since, Clayton has continued to grow and prosper. Martin Hanley's 129-year-old farmhouse still stands on the edge of downtown Clayton, a testament to the city's unique combination of urban flair and quiet community.

Clayton is recognized throughout the metropolitan area for an outstanding quality of life that combines a bustling downtown with quiet, secure residential neighborhoods for in a chic suburban community with urban flair. Clayton's central location and convenient access to several interstates and major arteries place it within minutes of just about anywhere in the region.

Quick Facts

  • www.claytonmo.govCity Website
  • 15,935Neighborhood Population
  • Clayton Public Schools
    Private SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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Clayton

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Living Here

Part of the city of Clayton, the DeMun neighborhood is an apartment district developed in 1923 on land once owned by Jules DeMun, a French-American fur trader who married the great-granddaughter of St. Louis founder Pierre Laclede. The large tract deeded to the DeMun family by the King of Spain in pre-colonial days was ultimately divided, the eastern part sold under protest to the city of St. Louis for the establishment of Forest Park, the western part sold to the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod to build Concordia Seminary, and the rest sold and subdivided for the creation of the neighborhood that bears their name.

Located near Forest Park and within easy reach of many of St. Louis's major attractions, the Hi-Pointe-De Mun area is a historic apartment district listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Quick Facts

  • www.claytonmo.govCity Website
  • 4,500Neighborhood Population
  • Clayton Public Schools
    Private SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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DeMun

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Living Here

St. Louis was founded in 1764 by Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau, and after the Louisiana Purchase, it became a major port on the Mississippi River. Its population expanded after the Civil War until it became the fourth-largest city in the U.S. In 1904, it hosted the World's Fair and the Olympic Games. St. Louis expanded rapidly in the early 20th century, but suburbanization from the 1950s through the 1990s dramatically reduced the city's population. Since the 1980s, revitalization efforts have caused an upturn that led to St. Louis receiving the World Leadership Award for urban renewal in 2006.

Downtown St. Louis is authentic, diverse, edgy, energetic and fun. With a creative community spirit, spectacular architecture, gorgeous views, fabulous restaurants, a growing list of amenities and services, and the most unique housing options in the region, it’s not surprising that those who live Downtown love Downtown.

Quick Facts

  • www.downtownstl.orgCity Website
  • 13,000Neighborhood Population
  • St. Louis City Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Downtown

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Living Here

Midtown is three miles west of the riverfront at the crossroads of Grand Boulevard and Lindell Boulevard. Residential and commercial development of Midtown followed the Civil War as St. Louis expanded west in the 1870s. By the 1920s Midtown was a bustling district akin to New York City’s Times Square. Midtown deteriorated rapidly after World War II. However, in the 1970s, Father Paul C. Reinert, President of Saint Louis University, inspired the urban renewal effort to rehabilitate the neighborhood and make use of its surviving buildings that continues today.

Midtown was St. Louis's second downtown for years, and, despite a period of decline has seen great renewal in the last decade or so. Serving as the city's premier theater and arts district, Midtown sits at the top of a rise in the surrounding terrain, thus presenting dramatic skyline views from most directions. The area also offers many historic buildings.

Quick Facts

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Midtown

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Living Here

Maplewood was established in phases from the mid-1800s and was one of the early suburbs of St. Louis, located just outside the city limits at the end of one of St. Louis's streetcar lines. Maplewood began as a bedroom community. Advertising suggested that people should get away from the city (in an era of common and sooty commercial, industrial, and domestic coal burning) and enjoy the fresh air of less densely populated areas. Maplewood is currently being revitalized by an influx of restaurants, businesses, and shops.

The residential areas of Maplewood offer a very eclectic mix of classical housing styles ranging from wood clapboard Victorians and Arts & Crafts-style bungalows to "gingerbread" brick bungalows and 21st-century townhomes. The Maplewood-Richmond Heights School District is intertwined in Maplewood's rich architectural history, boasting a high school building designed by the famous architect William Ittner.

Quick Facts

  • www.cityofmaplewood.comCity Website
  • 8,046Neighborhood Population
  • Maplewood-Richmond Heights School District
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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Maplewood

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Living Here

Originally called Maddenville after a prominent early resident of the area in the 1870s, the town became prosperous due to its position on the Manchester Trail and its connection to St. Louis by a streetcar line. In 1919, the town became the village of Brentwood and, in 1929, the city of Brentwood. In the late 1920s the village had a reputation for its gambling houses and illegal activities, but today is known as an attractive area for families.

Brentwood encompasses 2.5 square miles at the crossroads of US 40/I-64 and Hwy.170. Convenient access to Clayton, downtown St. Louis, and I-44. Offers a variety of housing options: apartments, condominiums, single-family homes of all sizes, and luxury villas for individuals, growing families, empty nesters, and retirees.

Quick Facts

  • http://www.brentwoodmo.orgCity Website
  • 8,055Neighborhood Population
  • Brentwood Public Schools
    Private SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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Brentwood

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Living Here

Originally known as the Dry Ridge to Missouri, Osage, and Dakota Indians, the area now called Webster Groves was designed to help promote immigration during the days of Spanish and then French rule. In 1892 the developers of Webster Park, an affluent community which would soon become the City of Webster Groves offering residents superb housing options in a country-like atmosphere as well as a swift commute to downtown Saint Louis jobs. As a suburban municipality, Webster Groves has its origins as five separate communities along adjacent railroad lines. Since that time, Webster Groves' tree-lined streets and abundance of single-family homes have continued to attract people to the area.

The geographic and economic diversity of Webster Groves is evident in the variety of neighborhoods, and its successes is rooted in the cooperation and willingness of community members from all walks of life to work together toward common goals.

Quick Facts

  • www.webstergroves.orgCity Website
  • 22,995Neighborhood Population
  • Webster Groves Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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Webster Groves

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Living Here

Established in 1853, Kirkwood has been called “Queen of the St. Louis Suburbs.” As the first planned suburb west of the Mississippi River, and an early railroad commuter suburb, it owes its very existence to the railroad and was named after James Pugh Kirkwood, the engineer in charge of locating, surveying, and building the railroad. From the beginning, it’s been a love affair between citizens and trains, as evidenced by the beautiful historic train station located in the heart of the city. The city also boasts an historic Farmer's Market, many historic homes, an aquatic center, ice rink, outdoor amphitheater, ball fields, tennis courts, picnic sites, playground areas, and more than 300 acres of park land.

Kirkwood retains the charm and character of its small-town past while also boasting modern amenities, abundant shopping, dining, and entertainment amidst a rare pedestrian- and family-friendly ambiance.

Quick Facts

  • www.ci.kirkwood.mo.usCity Website
  • 27,540Neighborhood Population
  • Kirkwood Public Schools
    Private & Parochial SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis City County
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Kirkwood

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Living Here

With a rich history and roots going back to 1837, Chesterfield was for many years an all-inclusive place name for a vast unincorporated area of St. Louis County. In 1989, the City of Chesterfield was finally established by its residents and thrives today as a major residential, business, retail, and transportation center on the western edge of St. Louis County.

Conveniently located 30 minutes west of St. Louis, Chesterfield is a vibrant community that offers a respite from the hustle and bustle of the city along with great attractions (such as the circa-1920 carousel and historic village in Faust Park), many award-winning restaurants, wonderful art galleries, great shops, an excellent community theatre, a three-rink ice skating complex, and much more.

Quick Facts

  • www.chesterfield.mo.usCity Website
  • 47,484Neighborhood Population
  • Parkway and Rockwood Public Schools
    Private SchoolsSchool District
  • St. Louis County County
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Chesterfield